Posted in Strategy

Turning your to-do list into a to-done list

Whenever we think about to-do lists or task lists we’re always thinking about ways to tic those checkboxes and feel like making progress. Here’s a question though…have you ever put items on your list you’ve already finished just to check them off?  Is this wrong?

I use Todoist to track my task list and one of the nice features is the ability to mark tasks with a tag to tie it to a specific project. I’ve taken to using the tagging option to go back and identify work I did during the course of the day to get a better understanding of where I’m putting my time

Each project in Todoist can have a color assigned to the project and any tasks assigned to the project also receive that color marker. By doing this when I look at the productivity chart it shows the number of tasks I’ve completed each day and color bars representing the number of tasks completed for each project.

For example, if I’m doing chores around the house I may also do a little car maintenance and decluttering. If my task is “house chores” for Saturday, it doesn’t give me a perspective as to if I’m keeping up with the auto maintenance or is the decluttering getting away from me. There’s a side benefit from capturing things after they’re done.

A sense of accomplishment often eludes us when we’re hard at work. Taking time to look back and appreciate the amount of productivity we’ve had rather than what we think we should have. Taking time to account for work we’ve done even if we haven’t captured it in advance is just as valuable to our productivity as making that list first.

Do you put done items on your to-do list? Does it help or hurt?

Posted in Strategy

Turning your to-do list into a to-done list | Productive Professionals

Whenever we think about to-do lists or task lists we’re always thinking about ways to tic those checkboxes and feel like making progress. Here’s a question though…have you ever put items on your list you’ve already finished just to check them off?  Is this wrong?

I use Todoist to track my task list and one of the nice features is the ability to mark tasks with a tag to tie it to a specific project. I’ve taken to using the tagging option to go back and identify work I did during the course of the day to get a better understanding of where I’m putting my time

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Posted in Tools

Using Todoist to manage reminders for OneNote

One of the recurring complaints about Microsoft OneNote is it’s inability to handle reminders on tasks. (Yes I know Evernote can do this…but we’re talking about OneNote right now.) I needed a way to create action lists in OneNote and then be able to track and follow up on items to do in the future without having to remember to check the OneNote task list frequently. Fortunately one of my favorite tools comes to the rescue…Todoist. 

Here’s the process I use to generate multiple tasks in Todoist from OneNote so I can ensure everything gets done on schedule: 

Step 1 – Create your action list in OneNote 

Type in your list as you would normally in OneNote. You don’t even need to use the To-Do Tag, just put in a return at the end of each line. 

Step 2 – Use Todoist syntax in OneNote 

For example, if I have something on the list to do on Friday at 3:00 p.m., I would enter: 

Call the vendor Friday 3pm 

Todoist can leverage this format to turn the last part (Friday 3pm) into a scheduled reminder when the item is added to a list. If we expand the example a little we get: 

Call the vendor Friday 3pm 

Follow up on meeting action items Next Monday 8am 

Follow up on vendor action items Two Weeks 

Step 3 – Copy and Paste 

Creating the Todoist tasks from the OneNote list is nothing more than a matter of copying the list from OneNote and then pasting the list into a new task field in Todoist on the web. Todoist is smart enough to recognize you are pasting a list AND will read the date formatting to create reminders for each task it loads. (It’s pretty impressive to watch the first time.) 

From this point you can complete the tasks in Todoist, get reminders, and know nothing is falling through the cracks. 

Pro TIP: 

If you add in the label and project syntax on an item, Todoist will assign the task automatically as well. For example: 

Call the vendor Friday 3pm #cloudhosting @Art 

Finding ways to make the tools in your productivity toolkit work together can make all the difference between just getting things done and truly being productive.